Toronto Life Magazine Feature

April 14, 2009

A month or so ago I uploaded a post that mentioned a photoshoot that I was involved in for an upcoming article in Toronto Life Magazine regarding the recession and how it has affected young urban professionals (such as myself). Now available for public purchase, the May 2009 issue of Toronto Life features a cover article called “How To Get Ahead in a Recession,” featuring my likeness on the magazine cover and within the article itself.

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Although the article itself is written from the slanted perspective of a generation Xer and the photography filters make the models appear rough and resilient, some of the arguments and points made are legitimately interesting comments about this important and difficult period.

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One major criticism I have for the magazine editor/Author of the article is that although the exposure for those mentioned/seen within the article is certainly a privilege, we models/consultants do not have our contact information or website links included anywhere in either the article or the edition itself. If this article truly was concerned about how to survive an economic recession, I think it might have considered including this info as an opportunity for networking and legitimate exposure (not to mention perhaps paying any/all models included from the shoot)….

So as not to make this post entirely about narcissistic self-promotion, there is also another interesting article in this edition called “A Mighty Wind,” regarding the issue of whether (and how to) implement the idea of integrating energy windmills into the toronto skyline. Enjoy!


Dinosaur Reconstruction: Sketch

April 6, 2009

On a lazy Sunday afternoon, I finally got around to some sketching that I’ve been meaning to tackle since I took reference photos at the ROM in 2008: dinosaur anatomy reconstruction, based on fossil evidence.

Dwelling on my pathological anatomy illustration experience during my time at the University of Guelph back in 2007 I decided to attempt a 2D anatomical reconstruction of a type of extinct raptor. Aided by  googled images of bird heads and musculature, anatomical textbook limb references, shots of various animal cadavers from the dissections @ Guelph and a few photos of my former pet iguana, I was able to produce a decent sketch of what could turn into a convincing, accurate series of renderings.

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Yes, I should have been spending this time working on my website layout, but no, that would not have been as entertaining. Although I like where this image is going, after considering the pose of the animal, I don’t think i’ll bother to render a final version of this raptor… however, with a better understanding of the anatomy, I might conceive a better composition later….


Spring Promo Campaign 2009

March 31, 2009

This week marks the launch of my Spring Promo Campaign for 2009; yesterday was spent composing various compilations for representation and exposure across the continent. I had hoped to have my new website layout completed and functioning before April; unfortunately, it will now be pushed back, hopefully uploaded within the next week or two (depending on workload). In the meantime, here are some of the promo image compilations for your visual enjoyment. Click on any one of them to access categorically selected works from my portfolio website.

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Shot in the face

March 22, 2009

On top of my already busy schedule, I was invited to and participated in a shoot for Toronto Life Magazine earlier this month. After confirming my information, I’m now one of a few other individuals who will be featured in an upcoming article about ‘the difficulties encountered by young professionals and recent grads entering their respective fields of business during an economic recession.’

Although I’ve yet to read the piece itself, I imagine it will be an interesting insight into the challenges faced by those of us breaking into an industry… during what is essentially the worst possible time to do so.

Look for the article in the April edition!


yes, another show this month

June 4, 2008

I have just submitted an interpretive piece for another show/event later this month in Toronto!
For those interested, details are as follows:

Get Moist” – Summer Solstice Party with Rynecologist New Look and DVAS

Event Info
Host:
MOIST BEAVER magazine
Type:Music/Arts – Opening

Time and Place
Start Time:Saturday, June 21, 2008 at 8:00pm
End Time:Sunday, June 22, 2008 at 2:00am
Location:
Whippersnapper Gallery
Street:587A College Street (just west of bathurst)
City/Town:Toronto, ON

1. “Summer Solstice” Juried Art show – featuring over 20 awesome artists. The art show will begin at 8, so come early and get in Cheeeeap! Also come early for Free snacks!

2. Super Sweet Summer Dance Party @ 10:30 – Live music from New Look, then Dj sets by DVAS and Headlining for the night is Rynecologist throwing down a really fun and fresh set to keep you real moist all night!

3. Last but not least of course, Pick up your copy of Moist issue 02 “T-shirts Sneakers & Sunnies” featuring over 60 pages of superbly moist content, for only 5$

5$ before 10p.m., 10$ After 10p.m.

The “Get Moist – Summer Solstice Party” is going to be Packed/Fun/Fresh& certainly Moist, so don’t miss out on some awesome Toronto Fun to celebrate the Summer Solstice!

www.moistbeavermagazine.com
http://www.whippersnapper.ca/


Halley’s comet is going to hit Iowa… in about 3 or 4 million years.

July 7, 2006

I am currently rereading (as well as occasionally listening via audiobook) to Bill Bryson’s “A Short History of Nearly Everything.” primarily a science and history based book, this work is a phenomenal piece of literature, not only for its factual and interesting content, but for its ability to clearly convey and illustrate intimidating concepts (that would otherwise be lost on many readers) through modernized examples and comparisons. Although I have only listened to half of the book, I have already learned more in just over two hours than I have during the entire summer. Already the book has covered topics ranging from physics to quantum physics to astrophysics, biology and chemistry, geology and geography, entomology, cartography, archeology, astronomy, mathematics, philosophy, radiology and palaeontology (just to name a few that readily come to memory). It is full of astounding facts and information about many interesting and incredible scientific fields, and deals with the discoveries, failures, legacies and conflicts of such famous figures as Pythagoras, Newton,read Cavendish, Marie Curie, Einstein, Bertrand Russel and Stephen Hawking.

Interesting fact derived from the text:

Were another planet capable of supporting sentient alien life, similar to our own existence, it would have to be based on a planet postulated to be at least 200 light years away. This means that, assuming this alien race were (right this minute) able to view our species upon this planet, they would actually be watching what we refer to as the 17th or 18th century, because of the spatial lag in light travel between locations. It would take centuries of viewing for them to reach what we would presume to call the ‘present.’

This phenomenon also means that in turn, were we to discover the same thing on a planet far, far away, that the effect would, of course, be the same for our viewing. This applies not only to planets, but to stars… which entails that any given star visible at night from anywhere on earth could, in fact, be long dead. The last rays of light emanating from its hypothetical death toward your eyes would still take an astounding journey through time and space to reach you, depending on its distance from your position. The North Star, for example, is about 680 light years away, according to Bryson’s research. Thus, if it were to burn out today, it’s death would go unnoticed until around the year 2700.

Interestingly enough, that also means that the North Star could have burned out sometime in the 14th century, and we just haven’t realized it yet.

Nuggets of grand information and knowledge such as this are contained within this piece of literature. It is a thinking book, and gets you wondering about tangents that lead you past imagination and wonder, and into the fantastically endless and insane realm of science.

Obviously, I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys both the scientific mystery and the tragedy of history… as well as an inspiring read.